Why “why?” is flawed.

When asked why, you have to choose a story and a context.

Why did I write this?

  • Because I’m frustrated about this word.
  • Because I want people to read my blog and understand me better?
  • Because neurons in my brain fired in a way that made my fingers dance over my keyboard which caused this blog post to be written.
  • Because I was motivated to do so.
  • Because it filled my mind and I want to get it out in a clear and understandable way for myself.
  • Because I want people to stop using  it in unhelpful ways.
  • Because I want to communicate better and I want people to understand each other.

The answer is not one. All of the statements might be valid, and yet when we ask why we usually want a definite answer. I can’t give you all reasons without creating an infinite list of these causalities. And to give you a truly accurate answer I must explain all  the history of what happened in this world since the start of time and existence itself.

When we ask why we really say: “Tell a convincing story. What made it happen?”

“Give me a satisfying answer”

So any answer to a why question will always be:

  • a constructed story
  • a simplification of reality
  • based on belief

Why would I use why then?

It can be used to make someone reflect and formalize their own reasoning.

It can be used to obtain indications of someone’s perspective.


What is a Black Box?

A Black Box is a system or process where all you see is:

  • Input – The things that affects the black box.
  • Output – The things that the black box produces or affects.Blackbox3D-withGraphs.png

This implies two things:

  • That you sometimes don’t know what happen within a system, even though you know what effects it produces.
  • That you sometimes don’t need to know how something works on the inside to interact with it on a meaningful level.

Whether used with intention or not, a black box symbolizes and represents hidden knowledge and the unmeasured parts of systems. Everything that is unmeasured or uncertain but happens anyways can thus be thought of as a Black Box.

What is magic?


“The most important decision you make in life, in any given moment is the decision of what is really going on. You can’t make any decision beyond it until you have made that decision and if you make a mistake on that decision in real life, then that has really grave consequences. Magic is this playground where you get to play around with that most important possible decision where it doesn’t matter.” – Teller

Making things happen in ways that people can’t explain. Making the appearance of an seemingly impossible event. Nothing fools you better than the lies you tell yourself. In magic the illusion (choice of method) is everything. The secret (method) is nothing.

The performance is shown to the audience while the actual process is hidden beyond the ledge of the known. Beyond the know-ledge.

Magic is showing an audience something so that afterwards when they ask how it was done, it leaves them without the clues or ability to know the how.

Basic rules of magic

  1. Never do the same trick twice.
  2. Never tell the audience a trick is being done.
  3. Never let your audience see your secret preparation.

The 7 basic principles of magic:

  1. Palm – To hold an object in an apparently empty hand.
  2. Ditch – To secretly dispose of an unneeded object.
  3. Steal – To secretly obtain a needed object.
  4. Load – to secretly move the needed object to where it is needed.
  5. Simulation – To give the impression that something that hasn’t happened, has.
  6. Misdirection – To lead attention away from a secret move.
  7. Switch – To secretly exchange one object for another.